Sligo Church History


Rev. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, visited Sligo a total of eleven times between 1758 and 1789. His journal records that his preaching in the town was generally poorly received. However, a small number of his followers opened a meeting-house in Bridge St. about 1775; it was described as "a small tumble-down building with a thatched roof". In 1802, a new church was opened in Linenhall St. (now Old Market St.), and in 1832 this was replaced by the present building in Wine St. which was completed at a cost of £800. It was opened by Rev. Alexander Mackey of Antrim, who drove from Antrim to Sligo in his pony-trap.


Many years later, the Wine St. premises still house a lively congregation. Adjoining the church is a new hall and suite of meeting rooms, which was completed in 2001 and opened by the President of the Methodist Church in Ireland, Rev. S. K. Todd. Until 2009 the church building was not in use due to the dangerous condition of the electric wiring, and meetings were held in the hall while plans were being drawn up for the renovation of the church.


The manse, where the minister resided, was built next door to the church sometime after the construction of the church, but its condition deteriorated over the years. In 1980 a new manse was built at Ardaghowen, less than 1 mile from the church, and the present minister on the circuit and his family live there.


An extensive renovation of the main body of the church building was completed in 2010.  The building now provides a comfortable and practical space for the mission of the church, and for the benefit of the wider community.


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